Cry Them A River: Why It’s Okay To Be Sensitive

13895461_699013643585518_572125152703386817_n
photo credit: shelby sheene photography

Have you been told you’re too sensitive? That you cry too much? That you need to grow thicker skin?  Actually, being sensitive is a gift, not a flaw.

It started like any other morning. I checked my work emails, sipped my coffee, and ended up on social media. Bored, I decided to watch a shared clip of a medium performing a reading. The video only lasted three minutes but by the end of it my face streaked with tears. The person being ‘read’ experienced an array of emotions; from deep sadness to profound relief about her deceased father. Her emotional response affected me on a deep level and for those three minutes, I was the one experiencing the grief and relief.   I thought of my own journey, the people in my life, the concept of life and death, and suddenly a floodgate of emotions washed over me.

I wiped my face and thought “Really? You’re ridiculous. It’s just a video!”

But then it hit me. Why was I scolding myself for crying over something that touched me emotionally? Why is it a weakness to feel and show emotion, to be sensitive, to allow myself to be charged by a random event?

We live in a world where we hear it all the time: Suck it up and deal with it. You’re too sensitive! What are you going to do, cry about it?

Sure, there are people who use their ‘sensitive status’ to obtain what they want. Or maybe they’ve been catered to most of their life and associate crying and being overly sensitive with self-entitlement. But this isn’t true for everyone. Turns out that sensitive people are very complex. They are more intuitive, better sympathizers, and exceptionally in tune with the world around them.

There have been several studies showing that individuals who tend to suppress their tears don’t…[READ MORE HERE]

What Makes People ‘Creative’? A Complex Look Into Creativity

 

fb_img_1474375903965

Necessity is the mother of invention.

You’ve heard this proverb before, right?  Basically, when stuck in a situation that requires something to change, the individual will create a new device or method to improve the situation.

But after reading Tim Vernimmen’s article Where Creativity Comes From, published for Scientific American, the proverb gets a new spin. The article focuses on a study done by Carel van Schaik of the University of Zurich, which reports behavioral patterns of orangutans when their food availability becomes insufficient. Instead of getting creative, they fell into energy-saving mode, essentially minimizing their movements and eating whatever unappealing foods they could find.

Fortified by another study by economist Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard University, we learn that reminding people of their financial struggles does not lead to innovative solutions. The bottom line is that difficulty doesn’t always lead to creativity, but preoccupation with meeting daily needs such as food and paying bills leave little opportunity to create innovative solutions.

“So if you ask me, opportunity is the mother of invention.” ~Carel van Schaik

 Mullainathan’s article highlights an important question: how complex is creativity and how can we pin down what makes an individual ‘creative’?

The creative mind is not primarily prompted by the need to survive. In fact, several studies state that individuals are ‘creative’ thanks to their mental flow. While the left brain is known to be a more analytical, linear, and disciplined thinker—and the right brain is more artistic, visual, and imaginative—the complexity of creativity goes way beyond that.

 

To read more click here